• paperpilot

    Hi Ed:

    Your exercise reminds me of the employee evaluations I used to endure. Then I read Peter Drucker’s opinion of them. Drucker believed evaluations were worse than useless, a drag on morale and employees quitting because they believed they were unfairly rated. After that I told them I wasn’t interested in evaluations & signed without reading them. I wasn’t going to be promoted at any rate.

    • edgandia

      I can relate. The great thing about this particular exercise, however, is that you get to pick the people you reach out to. And you get to use this however you want. There’s no crazy boss involved. No flawed corporate system behind it. No pointless reviews.

      It’s for you and for you only.

  • Great content this round, Ed. I was aware of this dynamic before I started my content writing/copy writing business so I determined to pursue the “fake it till I make it” approach. Didn’t work! ;0

    Your insights, your transparency, and your strategy was quite appreciated.

    • edgandia

      Thanks, Bobby! Glad you liked this one.

  • Gia St James

    This is a wonderful podcast. I suffer from this as well. Low self-esteem, as long as it is not crippling, actually makes us work harder, pay more attention to detail and strive to please. If we are on the opposite end of the spectrum, we become arrogant, cocky. Thus the quality of our work decreases. When trying to overcome it realizing that we have it, is a huge step becoming successful. The next step would be to get help to learn how to manage it, not overcome it. We need to learn how to realize that we are better than we believe we are. Yet we need to stay grounded and continue to still feel that part of us that wants to please, work hard, pay attention to detail, be real and still be able to laugh at ourselves (in private). I know from experience that this balance is very fine line.