#148: How Ana Lands Clients and New Opportunities with Her Own Lead Magnet

I’ve been a big proponent of using a lead magnet in your writing business as part of a comprehensive marketing strategy.

It’s no panacea. It’s not going to replace your prospecting efforts. At least not overnight.

But it can help you generate a steady stream of quality leads. And that’s reason enough to consider creating one for your business.

In this episode you’ll hear Ana Gascon Ivey, a copywriter and copyeditor who wrote and published her own lead magnet a few months ago.

She explains how this lead magnet has helped her land clients … and how it’s helped elevate her authority and open all kinds of doors.

By the way, if this idea sounds interesting to you—and if you already have paying clients—my team and I are now offering a new service where we write and publish your lead magnet for you.

And not just the lead magnet, but the entire support system, including:

  • A powerful, customized lead magnet (aka “buzz piece”)
  • The delivery and follow-up emails
  • The landing pages
  • The technology that automates most of this process
  • Plus the training on how to execute this powerful strategy

To learn more, send an email to ed at b2blauncher dot com … put the word “LEADS” in the subject line … and one of us will reply with all the details.

The notes that follow are a very basic, unedited summary of the show. There’s a lot more detail in the audio version. You can listen to the show using the audio player below. Or you can subscribe in iTunes to get this show delivered straight to the Podcasts app on your smart phone, tablet or iPod.

Tell us what you do today

Ana Gascon Ivey is a full time freelance copywriter and copyeditor. She writes and edits content for websites, blogs, email campaigns and social media posts largely for clients in the healthcare industry.

Before starting her freelance business, Ana spent four years working for a book publisher.

How did you get started as a freelancer?

Ana became a full-time freelancer in August of 2017. She was feeling stuck and bored in her job with the book publisher. She loved her editorial team but needed a change.

A position opened up in the company’s copywriting team, and she decided to apply. She took a writing test as part of the application process but was told that, based on her test results, they wouldn’t offer her the position. It threw her for a loop.

Around the same time, she read You are a Badass by Jen Sincero. It changed her frame of mind.

She started looking at other copywriting jobs. But they would mean commuting to Atlanta, about 45 minutes away.

Then she came across this podcast and became interested in the freelance world! She read The Wealthy Freelancer and Book Yourself Solid. Those books empowered her to become a freelancer.

How did you make the transition?

She realized she needed a product that would set her up as an expert in her field. She decided on an ebook. It would also serve as a writing sample as well as a marketing tool.

Her lead magnet format is 8” by 11.” It’s about 17 pages long, including cover, intro and bio pages. There are about 13 to 14 pages of writing, double spaced. It’s about 3000 words. The title is How to Hook Health Readers.

Originally, she was going to write about healthy eating tips, but she realized that was geared to consumers. She needed to switch gears and target marketers, editors and publishers in the health field.

She didn’t have all the tips in her head, so she had to do some research to fill some gaps.

It’s perfectly common to do some research when writing your lead magnet. That doesn’t mean you’re unqualified to write it. It just means you want it to be useful.

She recognized that she had to begin with the end in mind. She needed to figure out what her audience cares about—and how it intersects with her services.

What has your ebook done for you?

Ana started by tracking down email addresses for marketing directors. She would send warm emails with a link to her ebook. The first month was very slow.

She often wouldn’t get a response. Sometimes people would respond saying that they’d forward her email to the person responsible for hiring freelancers.

Ana would thank them and ask for that person’s contact info. She’d then follow up a few weeks later.

Again, she often wouldn’t get a response. She’d follow up a few more times and then would move on. It was hard.

How did you land your first few clients?

Ana started looking for work on the side before she left her day job. She ended up getting hired as a contractor with WebMD via LinkedIn. She saw a posting and applied. After a phone interview, she landed the job.

Landing that first client showed her that she could make this work. It boosted her confidence.

She continued to send out her ebook. Eventually, the work started pouring in.

She searched for health marketing agencies and started sending out her ebook. One of them contacted her. She’s now doing a big website overhaul for them.

Another marketing agency posted a contract opportunity in a Facebook marketing group. Ana threw her name into the hat, and they hired her. She included her ebook as part of her application.

She also landed a job writing for a magazine. A freelance writer she connected with referred her to them.

Similarly, she landed some work through Writer Girl. Ana’s book got their attention.

She’s been using her book as part of her application process for these projects and as part of her follow up process.

She continues to extract value from it. It opens doors. It shows her expertise and adds value to the services she provides.

Where are you looking to take your business in the next year or two?

Eventually, Ana wants to create information products that will bring in passive income. She also loves the idea of teaching and coaching.

A career as a freelance writer can be a gateway to many other kinds of entrepreneurial possibilities.

Once you’ve struck out on your own, nothing is out of the question.

How can listeners learn more about you?

Ana’s website: www.anascontentstudio.com